Looking around Amarillo, it's hard to deny that our city is growing. New housing developments are constantly popping up. People are moving to town, and some are looking for work.

The City of Amarillo currently has several positions open that they are needing to fill. Looking at the City's employment site, it shows almost one hundred open positions.

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Everything from the Libraries to Waste Management has a position open. You can look at the list here.

If you have kids that are needing a job for the summer, you might point them in the direction of Parks & Rec. Parks & Rec will be having a job fair later this month.

The positions they are needing filled are lifeguards, pool managers, and swim lesson coordinators. You can get more info on their job fair at this link.

Before I moved here, one of the biggest selling points anyone seemed to have about Amarillo was the employment rate. Amarillo has always had low unemployment. If you're looking for work, you usually don't have to look far before you find something that will help pay the bills.

Honestly, news that Parks & Rec is needing to hire for seasonal positions for the summer actually has me pretty excited. It wasn't that long ago that pools and all of our favorite summer attractions were closed.

On top of all of this, the new Thompson Park pool facility will be opening this summer. It was supposed to be open for Memorial Day weekend, but has been pushed back to the middle of June.

$2.7 Million Amarillo Home with a Lazy River

Check Out The Original Names For These Amarillo Streets

It's hard to imagine these well-known Amarillo streets as any other name. Try to imagine giving directions to someone while using their original names. Gets tricky, doesn't it?

The new names (that we currently know them by) came mostly from associates of Henry Luckett, who drew the first map of the area. When this took place exactly, records do not show, but the street name revamp is covered extensively in 'Old Town Amarillo' by Judge John Crudgington, published in the Plains Historical Review in 1957.