For the most part, we all know the classic superstitions - don't let a black cat cross your path, don't walk under an open ladder, never open an umbrella indoors, and more just like that. As I was researching why we are cautious on Friday the 13th, I stumbled across a list of superstitions on WideOpenCountry.com that are just for Texans. Turns out, not all superstitions are bad.

#5 - Don't dare kill a horned lizard - hopefully you have never committed this crime. It is said, that if you kill a horned lizard, your herd of dairy cows will go dry. Or even more creepy, killing the horned lizard or "horned toad" will cause your cows to produce bloody milk. Gross.

 

#4 - Stay alert during the Time of 'Canicula' - this one involves knowing some Latin and your star constellations. Canicula is the Latin name for the "dog star," which is part of the Canis Major constellation and is the brightest star in the night sky. This is where we get the term "dog days of summer," due to the star's appearance above the sun during the hottest days of summer. The legend comes from Native Americans whom believed the Time of Canicula was because of a "serpent-like" creature that would roam the land and snatch up children.

#3 - You can stop a storm with an ax - We are no strangers to bad thunderstorms and rough weather here in Texas and across the panhandle. One Texas legend says that if you stick an ax in the ground, it will ward off a storm. The ax is said to "split" the cloud and prevent the storm overhead.

#2 - You shouldn't point at a grave if you like your fingers - This one is more east Texas, however it is still something to think about next time you are near a graveyard. It is said that by pointing at a headstone or grave will cause your finger to rot and fall off. I will certainly think twice next time I do any pointing!

#1 - Horse hair can be used to keep the rattlesnakes away - I wouldn't rely on this to keep you safe from rattlesnake bites. In the old west, folks would do whatever they could to keep the rattlesnakes at bay and out of their camp. It was believed that if you made a coiled rope out of horse hair and put it around your camp, the snakes would stay away.

Do you believe any of these? What is a Texas superstition you have heard that we don't have on the list. Share it with us!