It never seems to fail. We find out about snow and we have to run out and buy up everything? Why? I don't get it.

Are You Guilty of Panic Shopping?

We have had snow three weeks in a row. Why do we continue to do this? I mean, yes it may be crazy a couple of days but that is it. No reason to buy out the stores. We do it all the time. This week was no different.

I went to Market Street on Monday to buy groceries. I thought on a Monday afternoon it would be great. The weather was nice. Yes, we knew the weather was going to get bad. It was only going to be a couple days. I just wanted normal groceries.

The store was crazy. I couldn't find some things I needed. It was hard to find plain, normal spaghetti noodles. I found one of the very few boxes and brands left.

credit: Melissa Bartlett, TSM
credit: Melissa Bartlett, TSM
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Oh and don't get me started on garlic bread. My daughter wanted plain garlic bread. We didn't want the kind with cheese on it. It was hard to come by just a small box of garlic bread.

credit: Melissa Bartlett, TSM
credit: Melissa Bartlett, TSM
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The shelves were empty. I finally found regular garlic bread but I had to buy the BIG box so now I have garlic bread for awhile.

credit: Melissa Bartlett, TSM
credit: Melissa Bartlett, TSM
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Another thing on my normal shopping list was Gatorade. Just a bottle or two. The shelves were empty.

credit: Melissa Bartlett, TSM
credit: Melissa Bartlett, TSM
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So Amarillo do better. Every time it snows you don't have stock up for the end of the world. I promise you. Just get what you need on a daily basis. It shouldn't be the end of the world feeling every single week.

We are going to be ok.

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LOOK: The most expensive weather and climate disasters in recent decades

Stacker ranked the most expensive climate disasters by the billions since 1980 by the total cost of all damages, adjusted for inflation, based on 2021 data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The list starts with Hurricane Sally, which caused $7.3 billion in damages in 2020, and ends with a devastating 2005 hurricane that caused $170 billion in damage and killed at least 1,833 people. Keep reading to discover the 50 of the most expensive climate disasters in recent decades in the U.S.