You hate to see it. But it happens. According to APD, someone out there has launched a new scam targeting those who willing to purchase a t-shirt honoring fallen police officers as part of a fundraiser on their behalf.

It sounds nice. However, Amarillo Police Department's Facebook post today made it pretty clear: it's not them.

For me, personally, the first big red flag is that supposedly this offer comes to you via text message. Never once in the history of my giving to a worthy cause has it ever started with a text.

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Second, the big obvious blinking neon sign screaming "scam" is the "42% cheaper." That is not how you tell someone that something is "40% off." Never in the history of ever have you walked through the mall and saw a

Next, is the fact that the text of the shirt says "Once a police...Always a police."

Friends and neighbors, have you ever met someone in law enforcement and heard them describe themselves as "a police"? The answer is no. It is so insanely wrong that it actually makes my brain hurt slightly behind my right ear.

Imagine it. An officer stands up at career day in front of a bunch of second grade students and says "I am a police." They'd laugh that person out of the room. That sentence isn't even finished. You're "a police" what?

See what I'm getting at?

However, judging from the screenshot that was posted by APD, it seems at least one person took the bait.

It's understandable though. One leisurely swipe through your Facebook news feed, and you'll find that a huge portion of the population has simply stopped trying to make sense when using the English language.

As always, think twice before you give your information to someone who is randomly asking for money. You can always do what several sharp citizens did in this case. Call and ask for more information before parting with your hard earned money.

See Also: New Scam in Amarillo Targets People For Missing Grand Jury Duty

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